Office Cubicle Feng Shui: Surround Yourself With Positive Energy

Office Cubicle Feng Shui: Surround Yourself With Positive Energy

Let’s face it: The office environment can be a serious bummer. Fluorescent lights, dentist-office style art, gray burlap walls — many work spaces are not going to make the cover of “Architectural Digest.” And that’s a shame, because there’s plenty of proof that the way you decorate your office cubicle can have a big impact on your mood and productivity. Even if you’re not ready to map your office’s bagua, you can use the principles of feng shui to bring more good vibes into your office cubicle.

1. Post meaningful things in your cubicle.


Anne Bingley Gallops of Open Spaces Feng Shui suggests using those burlap walls as a kind of inspirational bulletin board. Hang up items that remind you of your goals or previous successes. Post the org chart, if you’re a manager, and your business card to inspire pride in your work.

2. Lose the clutter.


Michael Schnippering of Feng Shui Works says that . In addition to clouding your energy and making your environment less pleasant to work in, clutter is an obstacle to organization. Anyone who’s ever searched desperately for a file in a stack of papers knows what we mean.

3. Hang art that means something to you.


Your office should reflect your personal aesthetic. Skip the generic Successories style prints and go for something that has meaning for you personally. Can’t think of a theme? Gallops suggests water or goldfish, which are said to represent cash flow and prosperity.

4. Don’t have your desk facing someone else’s desk.


Schnippering suggests that workers try to face their desks away from those of their office mates. Sure, it’s bad feng shui; but more practically, it’s just harder to argue with someone you’re not staring at all day. Can’t manage that? Good cubicle walls, like good fences, make good neighbors.

5. Hang a “Do Not Disturb” sign.


This is our favorite of Gallops’s suggestions, by far. If possible, we would hang “Do Not Disturb” signs in our cubicle, in the conference room, and on the bathroom door. (We could tell you stories of coworkers following each other into the powder room that would curl your hair.) If that seems mean, Gallops recommends hanging a hotel doorknob sign to inject a touch of humor into your plea for privacy.

Image: 1., 2., 3., 4. Business Insider, 5.

Posted by Jen

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